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2 edition of Strength microstructure relationships in a dental alumina glass composite found in the catalog.

Strength microstructure relationships in a dental alumina glass composite

Helga Hornberger

Strength microstructure relationships in a dental alumina glass composite

by Helga Hornberger

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D) - University of Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Biomaterials Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, 1996.

Statementby Helga Hornberger.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17294565M

  Glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina; Vita Zahnfabrik) became popular in the mids and incorporates a dry-sintered alumina core, which is infused with molten glass (Paul et al. ). With a flexural strength of MPa, it is indicated for full-coverage crowns and short-span fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Composite Materials Science and Engineering focuses on the structure-property relationships in composite materials. A detailed description is given of how microstructure of different fibers (such as glass, Kevlar, polyethylene, carbon, boron, silicon, carbide, alumina etc.) controls their characteristics.

In‐Ceram alumina (ICA; VitaZahnfabrik, Bad Sackingen, Germany) is an alumina‐reinforced ceramic that has been used as a core material for crowns and anterior 3‐unit FPDs for more than 2 decades. 5, 6 An approximately 20% larger die is manufactured using CAM. A larger die is necessary to compensate for sintering shrinkage. Characterization of the microstructure and microchemistry of a group of commercial 96% Al 2 O 3 ceramics, using analytical and conventional electron microscopy techniques, was conducted. A continuous glassy grain‐boundary phase was found in all samples, in addition to a number of intragranular and intergranular crystalline second phases; the phases present depended on the .

Dental porcelain (also known as dental ceramic) is a dental material used by dental technicians to create biocompatible lifelike dental restorations, such as crowns, bridges, and ce suggests they are an effective material as they are biocompatible, aesthetic, insoluble and have a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale. For certain dental prostheses, such as three-unit molars porcelain. Studies showed, for an alumina-based zirconia-reinforced glass infiltrated ceramic (In-Ceram Zirconia), lower flexural strength values (– MPa) than the ones found for Y-TZP [13, 15–19]. However, the Weibull modulus values obtained were in the same range as YZ, from 9 to 14 [ 13, 16, 18 ].


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Strength microstructure relationships in a dental alumina glass composite by Helga Hornberger Download PDF EPUB FB2

The morphology and microstructure of an Al 2 O 3 glass composite (trade name In-Ceram, Vita Zahnfabrik) were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composite was produced by infiltration of a lanthanum-based glass throughout a porous Al 2 O 3 body.

This alumina body was formed by three classes of particles differing in size Cited by: Strength measurements and fractography were used to investigate the failure of alumina‐glass dental composites containing 75 vol% alumina and 25 vol% glass.

Alumina compacts were prepared by slip casting and sintering at °C for 2 h. Dense composites were made by infiltrating partially sintered alumina with glass at °C for 8 by:   The ARB process used as a technique in this study provides an effective alternative method for manufacturing high-strength aluminum/alumina composites.

The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of the aluminum/15 vol.% alumina composite are reported. The composite shows an excellent alumina particle distribution in the by:   Some additives may be added during the production of alumina, such as magnesium oxide (MgO), zirconium oxide (ZrO 2) and chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3) in order to improve certain characteristics and mechanical rmore, the microstructure of polycrystalline alumina as well as some of its properties depends on the additives and the residual presence of silicon and.

The aim of this study was to compare the uniaxial flexural strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of nine dental ceramics, namely E1, E2, EC, IA slip, IA dry-pressed, IZ slip, IZ dry-pressed, DZ and an experimental 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 ZrO 2.

With respect to the microstructure, our aim was firstly to describe those features which may explain Cited by: Microstructure of zirconia-toughened alumina. A: alumina grains, Z: zirconia grains, Arrow indicates pore [5] Alumina-composite with other materials, used to increase the strength of.

The mechanical properties and microstructure of core materials have been advocated as crucial to the clinical long-term performance of all-ceramic dental restorations.

This investigation provides the clinician with data regarding strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of a. Objective. To synthesize a zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) composite with 70% alumina reinforced by 30% zirconia for dental applications and to characterize its microstructure and optical properties for comparison with the isolated counterpart materials and a first-generation 3Y-TZP.

Previous studies on IA indicate that the microstructure of the slip-cast material is coarse and heterogeneous, having about 20% of glass and 75% of alumina [23,25], which is in accordance with the results of the present study (Fig 1 and Table 1).

The microstructure of IA and IAE were very similar, yet different from AEM. Strength increased greatly by selecting suitable and continuous particle size distributions. Tabular alumina which is containing roughly equal to proportions of the various aggregate sizes, from medium on down to fine and superfine, helps to improve microstructure homogeneity, strength and minimizes volume instability of the composite.

The main aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of porosity, microstructure, and chemical composition on the wear and compressive strength of dental glass-ionomer or resin composite. Cylindrical samples (6 × 4 mm) were prepared from a nano-hybrid resin composite (Grandio®SO/RC, VOCO), a resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer™/VI, 3 M-ESPE) and a conventional glass.

Strength microstructure relationships in a dental alumina glass composite Author: Hornberger, Helga. ISNI: X Awarding Body: University of Birmingham Current Institution: University of Birmingham Date of Award: Availability of Full Text.

Concrete is a composite material that consists of a binding medium and aggregate particles and can be formed in several types. It may be considered to consist of three phases: a cement paste, the aggregate, and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between them.

In addition to ordinary Portland cement, the essential components of the base of concrete are aggregates and water.

The samples had a high bending strength ( MPa) and high fracture toughness ( MPam 1/2) and were free of shrinkage. Concurrently, zirconia (5 wt%) was used as an additive to alumina to improve the mechanical properties of both partially sintered alumina and alumina‐glass.

1. Introduction. Due to the unsurpassed mechanical properties of partially stabilized zirconia, its introduction to the dental market, almost a decade ago, considerably expanded the range of applications of ceramics in dentistry, a field where they are classically in demand due to their chemical inertness and a wide combination of optical properties, allowing excellent esthetics.

The mechanical properties of glass-ceramics depend not only on the nature of the precipitated phases and the glassy matrix but also on the microstructure (texture) of the material. It. Abstract. Dense and polycrystalline alumina (α-Al 2 O 3) is one of the most studied bioceramics due to the combination of its chemical inertness and its mechanical behavior (high compression strength and wear resistance), its good biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance.

Flexural strength and microstructure of two lithium disilicate glass ceramics for CAD/CAM restoration in the dental clinic Suk-Ho Kang, 1 Juhea Chang, 2 and Ho-Hyun Son 1 1 Department of Conservative Dentistry, Seoul National University School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.

Fig. 3: Ceramic alumina-based brackets Dental Implant Alumina was also used as dental implant. Sincenumerous new implant materials and designs followed, including the use of polymers, porcelain, high-density aluminum oxide, bioactive glass and carbon. InSchulte and Heimke introduced the Tübingen.

An alumina/glass composite was examined for use as a high-temperature ceramic adhesive for bonding of 96% alumina bodies. Four compositions of alumina and glass,and by wt.% were studied, referred to here as A, B, C, and D, respectively.

Rectangular bend bars were produced from compositions A-D by die pressing. Two half-sized bend bars of 96% alumina were. This book gives an introduction to the mechanical behavior and degradation of dental ceramics and guides the reader through their performance under effect of oral environments.

It addresses the different kinds of dental ceramics, their properties, degradation and mechanical aspects with less. Strength measurements and fractography were used to investigate the failure of alumina-glass dental composites containing 75 vol% alumina and 25 vol% glass.

Alumina compacts were prepared by slip. Dental resin composites have become the primary choice of most practitioners for the direct restoration of teeth owing to their esthetics and properties, both of which are highly dependent upon the microstructure of the materials.

The type, size, amount, and distribution of the reinforcing fillers are all critical determinants of the optical and physical properties of the composite.